How to Pronounce TOP 10 English Introductions

How to Pronounce TOP 10 English Introductions


Hi. I’m Vanessa from SpeakEnglishWithVanessa.com. Are you ready to imitate the top 10 introductions
in English? Let’s practice. Today, we’re going to practice the most important
introduction sentences in English, at least according to me. Because you’re going to say these natural
sentences again and again in daily conversation, this is a great opportunity to practice pronouncing
them correctly each time that you use them. Your challenge is to imitate me and speak
out loud. I don’t care where you are, at work, in the
car, at home by yourself. Practice out loud. And if you enjoy this video, make sure that
you check out part one, Imitating the Top 10 Sentences in English right up here. Number one: Hi, I’m Vanessa. What’s your name? Of course you’re not going to say Vanessa. You’re going to say your name, but let’s slow
this down so that you can say it naturally. Hi, I’m plus your name. Hi, I’m Vanessa. What’s … Makes sure that you say ts, that
TS here. What’s your name? What’s happening with the word your here? Notice my lips when I say your compared to
your. A little bit different. It kind of sounds like Y-E-R. This is the most natural fast pronunciation
for the word your. So, let’s say that quickly. What’s your name? What’s your name? What’s your name? Hi, I’m Vanessa. What’s your name? I’m kind of emphasizing what’s your name. Because I just said mine, so I want to know
now what’s your name. Hi, I’m Vanessa. What’s your name? Now, I’m going to pause and I want you to
fill in your name. I want you to say this sentence out loud. Practice speaking. Are you ready? Hi, I’m … What’s your name? Go ahead. Excellent work. Let’s go on to the second sentence. Sentence number two: Nice to meet you. Nice to meet you. What’s going on in this seemingly simple sentence? Let’s start at the beginning. Nice. Say it with me. Nice to meet, to meet. Here, the word to is being reduced to simply
T, just the sound T. The vowel O is gone, so we’re going to link together to meet, to
meet. But do you hear that final T sound on the
word to meet? Not really. Instead, your tongue is going to be at the
top of your mouth ready to make the T sound, but no air comes out. So, we’re going to say to meet. My tongue is stopped at the top of my mouth. To meet, to meet you. Nice to meet you. Nice to meet you. Can you say that out loud with me? Nice to meet you. Nice to meet you. I’m going to pause, and I want to say it by
yourself. Nice to meet you. Go ahead. Excellent work. Let’s go on to the third one. Sentence number three: I’m from the US, and
you? You’re probably not from the US if you’re
watching this, so you can fill in the name of your country. I’m from Mexico, and you? I’m from India, and you? Let’s break down this pronunciation. I’m from, F-R-O-M. Sounds like a U here, from. I’m from plus your country. Then, you want to reciprocate and ask the
other person. And you? Did I say and you? In this situation, the D is cut up. It’s gone. It’s on vacation somewhere. So, we’re just going to say an. An you? An you? An you? Where are you from? An you? Let’s say this all together. I’m from the US, and you? I’m from the U. S, and you? I’m going to pause. I want you to fill in your country and say
it out loud. Go ahead. Great work. Let’s go to the next one. When you first meet someone, it’s common to
talk about your surroundings. Maybe you’re both at the grocery store or
you’re both at a friend’s birthday party. You have this in common, so you’re going to
talk about it. Let’s imagine that you go to another country,
and you’re talking with someone, and they ask you, “How long have you been here?” You might say, “I’ve been here for two weeks. I’ve been here for two weeks. I’ve been here for two weeks.” You could also substitute if you’re at a university
or maybe if you’re at a job. I’ve worked here for two weeks. I’ve studied here for two years. You could change that verb, but we’re just
going to stick with I’ve been here for two weeks. Let’s break this down. I’ve been. This sounds like a short I, B-I-N, been. I’ve been here for. Why does for change to for? I don’t know, but that’s what happens. So, this is gonna sound like F-E-R, fOr. Kind of sounds like the fur of an animal,
which is F-U-R, but same pronunciation. For two weeks. I’ve been here for two weeks. I’ve been here for two years. I’ve been here for five minutes. I’ve been here for two weeks. Let’s say that quickly one time, and then
I’m going to pause so that you can say it yourself. I’ve been here for two weeks. Go ahead. Great work. Let’s go onto the next one. Common introduction number five is, what do
you do? This is asking what’s your job. This is the most common way to ask what someone’s
job is. What do you do? What do you do? What do you do? A lot of this is linked together, kind of
mumbled together. So, I want to help you pronounce it in the
same way. What do you? What do you? Can you say that with me? What do you? What do you? The T in what is cut out, and instead it’s
replaced by the word do, which is linked together. What do you do? Notice my lips aren’t really moving much here. What do you do? What do you do? Inside my mouth, my tongue is moving, but
on the outside, what do you do? What do you do? It’s not moving that much. So, I want you to say this with me. Let’s go slowly, and then we’ll speed it up. What do you do? What do you do? What do you do? What do you do? Why do you do? What do you do? What do you do? All right, it’s your turn. Go ahead. Excellent work. Let’s go on to the next one. The sixth sentence is, I’m a designer. I work for the marketing department. If you don’t know how to describe your job
or what your job title is, you can check out this video I made, 100 Job Titles. Hopefully it will help you to be able to describe
your job in these introductions situations. You could say, “I’m a designer. I work for … ” We’re using that same pronunciation
again, F-E-R. I work for the marketing department. Make sure that if you use this reduction,
for, you’re speaking a little bit quickly, you’re linking things together. If you said, “I work for the,” it’s a little
bit weird. You need to link it together if you’re going
to use that reduction because the point of a reduction is to reduce your speech to make
it faster. So, let’s say that together. I’m a designer. I work for the marketing department. I work for the marketing department. You can link those two words together. Work for, work for the marketing department. I work for the marketing department. I’m a designer. I work for the marketing department. All right, it’s your turn. Go ahead. Great work. Let’s go to the next one. The seventh introduction is for when you have
a mutual friend. Let’s imagine that you’re walking down the
street and you see your friend James. And James is walking with someone else, and
he introduces that person to you. So, you start to have a conversation with
that person. You could ask them, “So, how do you know James?” This just means, where did you meet? Do you work together? Are you his brother? What’s the situation? This is pretty common. Maybe you’re at a party and you’re just making
small talk with people. If that person who’s hosting the party is
James, everyone at the party knows James, so it’s a good question to ask. So, how do you know James? Great. You’re just kind of figuring out each other’s
relationships. Let’s pronounce this together. So, it’s a good way to introduce a new topic. So, how do you know James? This similar to what do you do, that kind
of lazy, not-moving-your-lips-very-much type of pronunciation. So, how do you know James? So, how do you know James? How do you know James? Can you say that with me? So, how do you know James? How do you know James? So, how do you know James? I’ll say that one more time, and then met
a pause so that you can say it yourself. So, how do you know James? Go ahead. It’s your turn. Great work. Let’s go to the next one. And continuing with the same idea, this person
who knows James might say, “Oh, we used to work together.” We used to work together. Used to often gets reduced to used to. We used to work together. We used to work together. Let’s break down this sentence. We used to work. This is a lovely word. It has an O, but it sounds like W-E-R-K, work
together, together. It almost sounds like ta, T-A, together, together. We used to, we used to work together. We used to work together. And when you link used to together, that means
that you’re reducing and you’re sounding more natural. So, let’s say this full sentence. Then, I’m going to pause so that you can say
it yourself. We used to work together. We used to work together. We used to work together. Go ahead. It’s your turn. Excellent work. Let’s go to the next one. The ninth introduction or common expression
that’s used the first time you meet someone is, I don’t want to hold you up. I don’t want to hold you up. This is probably what you would say at the
end of that quick conversation together when you first meet someone, and it means, “Oh,
I see that you probably have something else that you want to do.” Maybe you want to go grocery shopping, and
you see each other at the grocery store, or maybe you’re trying to talk to the host of
the party, James, and you just quickly had a quick conversation, so now you want to let
that other person leave the conversation and continue what they were doing previously. So, you might say, “I don’t want to hold you
up.” This doesn’t mean hold you physically, but
here let’s break down this sentence. I don’t. The T here is cut out. Your tongue is going to be at the top of your
mouth, but you’re not going to let the air through. I don’t wanna hold you up. Want to is linked together and makes wanna. I don’t wanna hold you up. Great. Let’s say this all together. I don’t wanna hold you up. I don’t wanna to hold you up. I don’t wanna to hold you up. It’s your turn. Say it yourself. I don’t wanna to hold you up. Go ahead. Thanks so much. Great work. Let’s go to the next one. The final expression that’s often used the
first time you meet someone is, maybe see you around sometime. Maybe see you ’round sometime. What does this mean? It means that maybe you’ll never see this
person again or maybe you will. I don’t know. But, it’s just kind of a polite way instead
of saying, “Okay, let’s make plans to see each other on Saturday 5:00.” No, you’re just saying, “Okay. It was nice to see you. Maybe see you again sometime.” So, you might say, “Maybe see you roun sometime.” What’s happening with the word around? Well, we’re cutting off the first letter. We’re cutting off the last letter, and we’re
just saying the middle part, roun, roun. This means around town or just somewhere in
general. This is the common reduction when we’re speaking
quickly. You’ll probably hear people say this in movies,
or TV shows, or in conversations, and now you can say it, too. Let’s say it all together. Maybe see you roun sometime. Maybe see you roun some time. Maybe see you roun sometime. Maybe see you around sometime. All right, I’m going to pause and it’s your
turn. Go ahead. Great work. You worked really hard pronouncing all 10
of these important introduction expression. So, I hope that the next time that you meet
someone new you’ll be able to use them and also pronounce them naturally incorrectly. Now I have a question for you. In the comments, let me know what’s a common
question or conversation topic that you usually have when you first meet someone. Do you talk about their job, their family? Maybe in your country you talk about their
age or something else that’s specific to your culture. Let me know in the comments what happens the
first time that you meet someone, and I’ll see you again next Friday for a new lesson
here on my YouTube channel. Bye. The next step is to download my free ebook,
Five Steps to Becoming a Confident English Speaker. You’ll learn what you need to do to speak
confidently and fluently. Don’t forget to subscribe to my YouTube channel
for more free lessons. Thanks so much. Bye.

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100 Replies to “How to Pronounce TOP 10 English Introductions”

  1. hii i l am listening your all videoes those are so powerful english language and i easily to speak in english

  2. Assalam venessa u know how much I like your video to improve
    My English even I'm sleepy thank u
    so much n take care

  3. Hi Vanessa, I like you and your teaching too much!! you are so nice and I understand your words completely. you teach English in an easy way. Thanks for all your lessons.

  4. Hi Vanessa
    when i talk to some one on chat for thierd or fourth time ,how i ask about him self instade of "how are you?"," what's up"or"how do you do".

  5. I always end up talking about the weather…. whether in English or in my native language. Boring.

  6. Like your videos. Do you have lessons about time tenses and situations where these are used?

    Sometimes I struggle with get or got can u make a video about that?
    Thank you

  7. Hi Vanessa, I'm Isa from Mozambique, but now I'm living in washington in seattle. you are really good teacher.

  8. Wonderful presentation Vanesa.Since I'm from India I'm not well versed with the native English speaking.But the way you teach is great as it gives a clear cut idea

  9. I think when I meet a person I may ask him about his health (since I'm almost nearing 50 ,I'm more concerned about health 😊)
    I may ask-Hi how are you?How things are going?Do you still play shuttle badminton or cricket?

  10. Hi vanessa,this is also a nice video that made by you.thanks for making such a video.
    In our country when we meet someone first,we want to know her name,her health,her occupation,her family,her house that means where he live.
    Its causal conversation in our country.
    Be happy vanessa.
    Love from Bangladesh 😍😍😍🇧🇩

  11. listening to your work ( fantastic job ) i realise how important prononciation is .. that should be the first teaching in every shool ( i'm french) i think that initial work would ease and accelerate learning – i personnaly still spend too much time hesitating between two words because of a bad perception – so basic though…

    thanks so much Vanessa !

  12. Excuse me, sir?

    Are you the person responsible for the foul flatuent air here at Chili, Cheese, Bean restaurant?

  13. Vanessa, you share your knowledge and we thank you a lot for that, but do you know that you share also your positive energy and kindness ? You are a therapy for happiness ! Love U as a member of my family <3

  14. Hi, dear Vanessa, I live in Toronto I always follow your post all are very useful and especially this topic that you teach 🙏🏻🌹 and thank you for typing the words and sentences as an example to show us because most of the time I can't realize what was spelling the new words to check the meaning and practice them that you used in the concept .
    At the end wanna say You are the best.❤️🙏🏻

  15. Loved this video…I used my pronunciation muscles and learned many things… Thank you so much Venessa… Lily from India…

  16. Assalam
    Vanessa nice your
    Video n I'm trying to
    Write them mostly
    Please keep it up
    N thank u so much

  17. Nice to meet you I'm Ivette from Nicaragua I'm 42 and I always see your videos. it's very useful thanks Vanessa

  18. Hii …I want to ask you one question and that is have you ever been to india ?And if yes then which part or city….

  19. Hi Venessa. I am from india. i am a beginner and i am improving my english by watching your videos and your videos are really helpful. Hope one day i will become a fluent english speaker. . ☺️☺️ Peace and love✌️

  20. When someone says maybe see you around sometime, can we answer: « I hope so » ?
    Thank you so much for your help
    You’re adorable 😊

  21. These contractions are applicable only to certain areas of the USA and North America, for that matter. Many New Yorkers, Canadians and west coasters say "for." This is just an example, but I could dispute several of your pronunciation tips.

    As an English teacher, it's concerning how you're teaching new learners bad speaking habits, Vanessa. They should strive to say things correctly, not saying "fer" instead of "for." Just a recommendation… Wish you the best.

  22. I understand you easily)) I don't understand why? !))) I like your eyes …your lips. Your voice. …Thank you so much for your job! ! Thank you….Love you))☺🌼🌹🌸sorry. ..

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