Hook Norton in Days Gone By


A modern view of Hook Norton… but in this film we hope to show you scenes of the village and some of its inhabitants… between about 1890 and the middle of this century We start with an early view of the Norman church… showing no steps and the high churchyard wall… which was lowered and set back in 1960… the cause of much concern at the time The earliest fairs and markets were held in the churchyard, and later in the Square Scaffolding around the tower in 1913 When the original clock face was raised,
two more were added… and a good deal of work done to the tower The old school and the church, showing the new clock face on the west side The niche below was probably occupied by a statue of St Peter… and removed by the Reformers in the 17th century In the chancel we see the curtains either side
of the altar… which were given by Mr Bull, the vet, on the occasion
of his daughter’s wedding The Reverend Beardshaw, Rector from 1924 to 1932,
had them removed Looking to the south side, we see rows of pews on the site of the present altar… which was installed after the Second World War The brass plaques on either side record the names of the 33 men from the village… who were killed in the First World War… and six between 1939 and 1945 The eight bells were also recast and rehung… in memory of all who had served from the village In March 1882 a stained-glass East window
was installed in memory of John Richard Rushton… rector of Hook Norton for 40 years
from 1841 to 1881 In March 1883, a new pulpit was installed This is a more recent view in the church… and shows the screen which was erected by the Reverend Nind… who was rector for 23 years from 1932 to 1955 A fine example of a Norman tub font In August 1880, there was a Sunday school outing to Swerford Park… for which five farmers provided horse-drawn wagons
for transport The Reverend Freeman and Dolby Phipps
who followed his father as sexton… an office that they held between them for 79 years The Miss Dickins played a very active part in the village and church life Their names are inscribed on the treble and second bell
as a tribute to their memory Barbara died in 1943 and Margaret in 1947 The Reverend Freeman and the choir… have their photo taken outside the tower entrance
in 1910 Among those in the choir are George Sabin,
Alfred Borsberry, Nelson Bowler, William Sweatman… William Bloxham, Harold Wyton, Reginald Bowler
and Fred Wyton The church choir entered the Bucks and Oxon choir competition… and were winners several consecutive years
in the 1930s The Reverend Nind stands on the far left… and Frank Wyton third from the left
who was sexton for 67 years Miss Margaret and Miss Barbara Dickins are seated in the centre… and the small boy in front of them with the shield is Albert White The Reverend and Mrs Nind started a Mothers’ Union… on December 15th 1937
which lasted until 1971 Opposite the church is the Square
and Reeves House, dated 1775 F W Phipps had a butcher’s shop here for 40 years The house had a front door opening onto the highway then… and the house just above was known as Belldin
and owned by the Colegraves at this time The F W Phipps butcher’s delivery van
with Sydney Wyton Coronation Day celebrations for George VI
on May 12th 1937… the road by the Square completely blocked
by spectators Maypole dancing in front of the Sun and Red Lion The Red Lion was selling celebrated Brackley ales and stout… while the Sun sold Hook Norton ales and stout
and also advertised good stabling A last century scene when farm stock sales
were being held in the High Street Another early view of High Street The first shop on the right, here called The Bazaar… was a milliner’s kept by Francis and Eva Cook in 1895 Shortly afterwards Turnocks took over… followed by Gaddes in 1939 Mary Ann Moulder was a dressmaker… and lived in the next house with a tailor’s window near the roof The shop on this side of Queen Street was said to have been the Rose and Crown public house early last century In 1854, G Brewer was a tailor and draper here… followed by John Frederick Spatcher, who was a grocer Around 1908 Mr and Mrs F Busby opened up
a butcher’s shop here… and the same business was carried on by Ralph White around 1920… and later Messrs. Butler, Marley, Hodges and Horn There were three butchers in the village
early this century A Christmas display in Mr Busby’s day Unfortunately he was killed in the First World War Ralph White, who succeeded him, is on the right
holding a pole-axe Next this side is Dial House with its square sundial above the door Alban Bull, a veterinary surgeon, lived here in 1871… and Barclays Bank had a branch here in 1931 On the right, the shop of Spatcher’s grocery
before the butcher’s shop The one on the other side of Queen Street… was Osborne’s the tailor’s from 1887 to 1914 Mrs Spatcher then took it over with the Post Office and General Stores Next to the churchyard we see Hiatt’s shop… Hatters, Drapers Outfitters etc, probably around 1910 Reuben Green took over this shop later Around 1923 an experimental monolastic
road surface… was being laid from Scotland End to Milcombe The material was brought by rail to the Brymbo site where it was prepared for use The band leading a parade up High Street
with Magdalen Lodge on the right… and the dwelling on the left that adjoins Priestfield was the first Post Office… kept by Fannie Harris from 1872 till it moved to the corner of Queen Street in 1914 It had been open from 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. on weekdays… and 8:00 till 10:00 a.m. on Sundays Looking down High Street, we see a horse- drawn passenger vehicle… and a steam traction engine at the entrance to
Bell’s Tchure On the extreme right we see part of the old dungeon
or lock-up The old fire pump and the oil street lamps
have been housed here On the end of the house behind was the AA sign Banbury 9 miles and Chipping Norton 7 The Turnocks’ stores with their horse-drawn delivery van The bay window recently installed at a cost of £100 They had the first bus in the village, a Ford Model T
in 1921… and the first petrol pumps Next door is the Bell Inn which was kept by
Henry Turnock at this time Many public events took place here In 1858 the United Provident Society had a parade
to the church… led by Bloxham band and followed by a dinner
at the Bell The petrol pumps can just be seen here by the shop… with delivery pipes reaching out to the roadside Gaddes own the shop at this time… and the vehicle by the triangle is probably their taxi We now see five motor vehicles in High Street The railings by the footpath had not long been erected… and the concrete edge to the new road surface
is noticeable Outside their home at the bottom of Queen Street… we see Will Fairbrother, Mrs Fairbrother
and Mrs Grimmett There is an old saying that there was a tunnel
from this dwelling to the church The three dwellings behind Borsberry’s blacksmith’s shop The Borsberry family lived in the nearest Daisy Haynes had a sweet shop in the middle one… and Dolby Phipps, a clock mender and barber,
was in the lower one The thatch was removed from these dwellings
around 1947 Spectators on the bank in front of these last houses… watching the flower show procession in High Street in 1923 On the lower side of High Street and on the corner of Bell Hill were Henry and Thomas Borsberry… who were shoemakers, saddlers and harness makers… from 1869 to the end of the last century Next along, seen here, was W H Heritage… another saddler and harness maker in the 1930s He later moved his business to East End General shopkeepers followed in this area… the latest being Mr and Mrs Manning
who converted their shop back to a dwelling in 1984 Here the saddler’s is a general store… with a similar one to the right On the left we see a car and a petrol pump just outside Mannings’ shop… and a bus in the Square The fire brigade lead the procession… for the celebration of the coronation of George V
in 1910 Fancy-dress contestants among the parade… passing through the High Street for the flower show
in 1923 Wisteria House, the home of the Allens… followed by the Painters who farmed land
in the South Hill area Barclays Bank had a room here at this time: their plate is on the left of the front door Next to the Bell was the Banbury Co-operative
Industrial Society’s shop Standing outside, left to right are: Billy Horn, Mr Robbins the manager, and Bill Croft In 1871 John Lee Bourton, a farmer and butcher,
kept a shop here In the early 1970s it was converted to two dwellings One of the horse-drawn delivery vans… which were taking bread and grocery over a wide area at the beginning of this century Fred Coleman is standing by the horse Just above the entrance to the Rectory and
the road to Down End… was Coleman’s General Stores, who killed and cured their own pig meat They sold groceries and almost everything that the villagers were likely to need They were later taken over by Pillsworths But before Coleman’s F W French was a grocer
and farmer here in the 1870s From the other end of High Street,
we look back to the church tower… before the extra clock faces were added in 1913 The old school was built in 1875… with the schoolhouse adjoining this side of it Mrs Mobley, a well known carrier, was living in the schoolhouse in the 1950s and 60s… and was a school caretaker She died in 1966 Samuel Tims was a baker in the house on the left
in 1907… and later carried on his business in the house opposite the Memorial Hall From the church tower we see Bell Hill cottages which have a date-stone of 1752 with the letter G over B W G Francis and Eva Cook were milliners in the top cottage… and boot and shoe repairs were carried out in the bottom one The allotments this side of Park Hill
are in the background The Square and the blacksmith’s shop on the left The Borsberrys were here in 1887… and S Borsberry & Sons until 1940 A fire in the club room behind the Lion in 1945… also set fire to two thatched cottages adjoining,
which we can see here In the 1950s a garage with a flat roof was built
on the site A view towards the Green and East End The thatched cottage at the end of the Green was burnt down in 1929 The Wilderness allotments are on the right An old view into Southrop and the village
taken from the top of the viaduct The thatched cottage that adjoined the Wheatsheaf
can just be seen… and the windows in the roof of Southrop Farm House… and the cottages in Ashburton Lane An early tower view looking into the Shearing Close… which was church property until 1774 Behind are the first council houses… built from stone that was dug on the site… and costing £1100 each Note the tall fir tree at the entrance Originally there was also a five-bar gate here Here we see the workers who were building
the council houses in 1921 Looking down to the top of Queen Street,
previously Garrets Lane It is odd to think that in 1935… the parish council were considering closing this lane to all through traffic The Westons were blacksmiths on the left here
till the 1950s Talbot House, next to the lane, was the Talbot Inn
in the 18th and 19th centuries Laburnum House on the opposite side is dated 1679 The Busby family lived here, and were builders,
painters and decorators Looking into Southrop, first mentioned in 1316 In the 18th century there was a constable
for the north side of the Rop stream… and one for the south, and neither could take action in the other’s area There were tan pits on the corner of Park Lane The building there now has a flat roof… and the thatch on the roof up Brick Hill
has been removed Joe Dumbleton lived up Brick Hill He was a pig killer and a town crier early this century Looking down towards the Paddocks,
known for an extensive and beautiful garden… and used by the village for numerous social events The house was built in 1836
on the site of a previous one Note the hand pump in the school playground The late John Hands in the Paddocks’ yard A view from Swerford Road… showing the Wheatsheaf with its adjoining thatched cottage… and Beanacre Cottage on Cross Bank… which was used as a overspill area for various celebrations in the village The site of a village pound on the opposite corner… and to the far left was the Quaker Meeting House,
built in 1705 It was being used for evacuees as well as meetings
in the Second World War… and demolished in 1953 There was no Quaker burial ground,
the one at Sibford Gower being used The Baptist Chapel built in 1871
on the site of a previous one The first Baptist congregation was formed in 1640… and in 1728 Hook Norton was a centre
for 22 surrounding villages… Stow-on-the-Wold being one of the most distant The Baptist schoolroom was built on the site
of cottages in 1873 The interior of the chapel early this century
with its tortoise stove and oil lamps On July 21st 1872 the Baptist Sunday School went
to Edgehill for a picnic Just below the school-room, on the left here, is the Baptist Manse, built in 1871 At one time there was an open-air baptistry
behind the manse There were two thatched cottages on the left
by the horse rider… and lived in by the Gardners, both thatchers Francis Veal’s sweet shop is on
the opposite side of the road Opposite the Manor we see Harry Gardner
with his champion Golden Bennett racer Standing well back from the railings are the two dwellings built around 1895 One of these was a police house… before the County Council built a new one
around 1970 on their land in the Bourne This is a last century picture of Bray’s saddlers’ shop… which appears to be standing in the gardens of the two dwellings just mentioned… and could well have been taken before 1895 This is a close-up of the board above
the saddlers’ window Looking down Netting Street towards the village In the last house before Watery Lane,
E Haynes was a baker… and behind it there have been three butchers
in this century: Messrs. Stanley, Eagles and Dumbleton Still looking in the same direction… we see the plot of land long before being built on… also the long thatched cottage and barn George Archer ran the first taxi service from this cottage The Manor has no front garden… and this is a view of the house from the large and beautiful garden at the back The house has the date of 1636 with the letters R A… and it belonged to the Austin family in the 17th century Another picture of Hook Norton’s champion cyclist with a group of admirers Hook Norton teenagers in the hut that was built in 1953 for the Air Training Corps It stands on the one-acre rickyard which, with Stapenhill House below… once belonged to the Manor opposite These are some of the 25 members of
2207 Squadron… in whom Dr Agnew of Sibford, who had a pilot’s licence, took a great interest The hut was also used by the band and the Young Farmers’ Club The original rent for the site on which it stands
was £2 per annum At Scotland End we see the grass triangle… with the signpost, the oil lamp and the heap of stone
for road mending… and the tall elm trees behind The Pear Tree, a Hook Norton Brewery house
since 1869… with a Bedford brewery lorry outside,
probably in the late 1930s The oil lamp, the Chipping Norton Road… and the cottage by the Pear Tree that had
its thatch removed in 1939 The small barn that stood at the bottom
of Brewery Lane Above Round Close is Marrie Mount, said to have been the Crown Inn It has a cellar the length of the house and had hooks on an outer wall… that could have been used for tying up horses Above is Scotland Mount, the home of Mr Newton… a hay dealer in the 1920s The Heythrop hounds meet outside the Pear Tree
in 1932 Bungalows were built on land on the left in 1968… at a cost of £7,000 each The bridge on the corner was built in 1820 Prior to that there was a ford here… and what was known as Washbrook Ditch Around the corner was Austin Hall’s
wheelwright’s cottage He was also a well-sinker There were 137 wells in Hook Norton at one time This house was occupied by several generations
of the Hall family… going back to at least 1774 They had the upper storey added in 1888 The late Francis Smith, nee Hall… can just be seen at the garden gate in the 1920s A 1904 view showing the wheelwright’s cottage
on the extreme left… Harwood Farm House in the centre… and Brooklyn Farm House on the right The Brewery which was started in the 1850s
by the Harris family This is the new tower brewery that stands on the site of the previous one It was built in stages around the end of the last century… and production continued during the rebuilding The Thornley steam engine, now oil fired, pumped water to the top of the building The large stable buildings behind were being rebuilt around 1904 A large number of workmen during the rebuilding The front near completion but a large part at the back still not started Some of the brewery employees early this century… when there were about 24 on the production line
and 15 draymen In the earlier part of this century beer was being sent by rail to the more distant customers… such as Working Men’s Clubs in Coventry Office staff early this century: front row: Frank Veal, Harold Wyton. Ernie Robbins and George Groves Middle row: Messrs. Drake, Walker and Allen… and at the back: Mr Stratford During the wars, supplies were very limited An early view of spectators in their best hats
at the flower show in the Shearing Close At the end of the last century, the Shearing Close
was being considered for a cemetery Swings and roundabouts in 1908 At the 1912 flower show and the start of
the slow bicycle race There was usually a fancy-dress competition… and in 1926 we see Frank Gardner with Bert Beale holding the baby In 1921 the events included an open-air whist drive The large marquee in the background would be full of vegetable and flower exhibits Fancy-dress prize winners in 1921 The main venue for the flower shows
was the Shearing Close… but the Park may have been used on one
or two occasions The comic football teams in 1924… with one of the recently built council houses
in the background The dog show in 1922 In 1932 a fine tree in the Shearing Close provides shade for the band In the background is the old thatched barn
on the Bourne side of the field Mr and Mrs Clarkson with their staff and
the Reverend Freeman… outside the old school about 1908 When the new infant school opened in 1900, this allowed for the education of around 300 children In 1883 there were two Sunday schools attended by
over 200 children This is about 1921 with Mr Clarkson, headmaster,
and his wife, headmistress of the infants In the back row: probably Violet Veal, Maud Stratford,
Mr Wyatt and Lucy Veal Mr Clarkson was headmaster for 36 years,
the longest on record In 1873 the Young Men’s Mutual Improvement Society gave a concert in the school Another early view of teachers In 1867, Mr Etchells, who had been headmaster of
Hook Norton school for 15 years… was forced to resign… because he would not conform to the high church teachings of the Reverend Cox, the new Rector A group outside the infant school The Reverend Freeman took a great interest in
the school and paid regular visits In 1872 out of 150 pupils, 110 were away with measles Another group of slightly older children At the annual meeting of school managers,
on May 22nd 1890… there was a discussion and argument as to why
there had been 15 different teachers in nine years Two teachers and more children outside
the infant school Miss Cross created a record by being a teacher at
Hook Norton School… for 42 years, from 1924 to 1966 This is a more up-to-date picture of the teachers at the secondary modern school in the 1958-59 period Back row: John Long, Jeff Walton, Joan Lawrence,
Bruce Barn Front row: Rosemary Davis, Betty Cross, Harry Broadbridge, Gerald Bright and Bertha Collins The secondary modern school opened in 1950 with around 120 to 130 pupils Mr Thompson, headmaster, with the Hook Norton children’s choir… on the Chipping Norton Town Hall steps
after winning the Stour Choral Competition in 1927 In the early part of this century children were going home for dinner… but, later, school dinners were provided in
the Memorial Hall prior to the building of the new school A performance of Aladdin by pupils of Hook Norton church school in 1929 Hook Norton troop of Boy Scouts,
but the site is unknown It appears to be in the First World War period During the Second World War, there were a large number of evacuee children in the village… causing education and accommodation problems The Heythrop meet outside the Red Lion in 1929 The cottage next to the Red Lion, which was burnt down in 1945, can be seen here A large gathering of spectators in front of the churchyard wall on the same day And again in 1928 outside the general store… which was probably kept by Reuben Green at this time Watching another meet around the same time In 1926 J Jackson, C Hewitt and Mr Knight bought
three-quarters of an acre… at the top of Queen Street to construct a building
for electrical equipment… and a bungalow for a resident electrician Here we see Charlie Hewitt and the building being demolished Completed building with “Hook Norton Electricity Supply” in the apex In 1927 the first three customers were R Green,
F Phipps and Mr Colegrave Wiring was done by Charlie Hewitt… and W Weston, the blacksmith, made the metal brackets to carry the overhead cables This was the diesel engine supplied by Fielding & Platt
of Gloucester which drove the dynamo… charging up to 140 batteries to an average
of 240 volts DC… which supplied the 40-watt bulbs in the village This engine weighed 10 tons and had
a 10-foot diameter flywheel By 1935 the Shropshire, Worcestershire and Staffordshire Company were taking over From Bell’s Lane we look down to what was
the Asylum Yard… which had two large wooden doors at the entrance In the early part of the last century
over a hundred patients… some in a dangerous condition
were housed here When the County Asylum was built
these premises were closed in 1854… and the building in the centre was converted
to six cottages Around 1960, these cottages were demolished… and a new council development took place Gingerbread Cottage remains in the background
and is dated 1625 Some of the Asylum cottages that were condemned
and demolished… after being inhabited for villagers for many years Looking up from Down End towards High Street
we see the tite and five or six thatched dwellings The one on the left, with the board over the door
was the home of two beer retailers: William Cox in 1895,
followed by Nelson Chapman Higher up the road on the right was J Hatton,
a carpenter and wheelwright… followed in the same trade by J Robins Looking in the opposite direction is
the Wilderness allotments, now built on… and the viaduct next to the station in the background Looking back up Bell’s Lane
with the cottages on the right… and behind the one at the end of the Green that was burnt down in 1929 The fire at Down End on August 4th 1911… when three thatched cottages were destroyed by fire The stone from the ruins was used to build Stuart House soon afterwards At the bottom of Down End, on the left, is
the two-spouted hand pump… and the cemetery, the site of which was bought by
the parish council in 1898 for £147 10s Well Close was in the corner of this plot… and the site of the first chapel,
from 1829 to around 1885… when the stone was used to build the new one
in Chapel Street In the earlier part of this century, the metal cemetery gates were kept locked… with keys available to those who needed
to attend graves The top cemetery was consecrated on August 3rd 1941 The two cottages at the bottom of Park Hill that were demolished to make way for new development Prew’s Close on the right, where two bungalows
now stand… was owned by the parish council and used
for a short while as a children’s play area… before the equipment was moved to the Shearing Close The parish council sold this plot of 1.3 acres
for £1,200 A view from the Park looking into the bottom cemetery… with the Wilderness allotments on the other side
of Tite Lane The cottages that were burnt down… and just below is Harris’s timber yard In the earlier part of this century his horses and
traction engines… were bringing in timber carriages loaded with tree trunks to be sawn down in this yard… to supply the local wheelwrights and timber merchants Mr Harris on the extreme right standing by
Black Prince in his yard This engine is now at Bressingham Museum Mallam’s Close allotments were behind the timber yard Looking down Bell Hill The cottage on the left is the home of Jim and Percy Hackling… who did boot and shoe repairs between 1931 and 1955 Bridge House at the bottom was a private lunatic asylum from 1725 to 1854 The Miss Dickins and their brother came to live
at Bridge House in 1896 This bridge is the oldest in the village… and was widened towards Park Lane in the 19th century From here we see Middle Hill, unrestricted at this time… which was the main route from Southrop to the church and the school On the right up the hill were J Tappin and Sons… blacksmiths and carriers from 1871 into this century Note the white rail fenced water supply known as a tite Middle Hill has also been known as Blacksmith’s Hill This dwelling was where George White
the undertaker lived… and the small cottage just above has been a surgery
in more recent times… for Dr Latcham from Chipping Norton until 1970 On the right, at the bottom of Middle Hill… John Woolgrove started a bakery business about 1864 He was followed by Richard Rowles in 1871 Then Woolgrove & Bayliss and finally C A Cox in 1931 On the right hand side of Bell Hill Mr and Mrs Smith
were bakers in the 1890s… followed by James Christmas who moved to here from Wisteria House… and delivered bread over a wide area
with two smart horse-drawn vans Just above this dwelling was Mr Gurling,
boot and shoe repairer An early view of the same area and much of the property thatched at this time Thomas Pargeter was cleaning, filling and lighting
18 street oil lamps in 1906 but they were usually not lit during the full moon period A very early view of a water cart on the wooden bridge over the Rop stream Looking up Bridge Hill across what was once called Blackmoor Bridge The window of a thatched cottage on the left
has been boarded up Another view of Bridge Hill after the end cottage
in the last photo has fallen down On the extreme left is part of Woodbine Cottage… which was bought in 1964 for £540 An outside staircase part way up Burycroft Road The children were involved in numerous concerts… to raise money for the Red Cross during
the First World War time This is a 1916 photo but we’re not sure
where it was taken Girls lined up for Tommy Atkins in front of
the old school… Another one with location unknown And the same girls in a patriotic display A pleasant view of the church from the top of Brick Hill The house facing us went with Fanthill Farm
in the earlier part of this century… and was occupied by Robert Stearman To the left is Southrop Farm House
with a date-stone of 1645… and the front of the house has unusual stone mouldings The house on the right is where Tom Smith
ran a butcher’s business earlier this century There is a date-stone of 1798 on the end of the house This shows the two houses behind the footpath
to Rope Way… an unusually tall chimney behind
and the oil street lamp in front Beanacre Cottage, the embankment and viaduct… and the old Fleur-de-lys or Wheatsheaf on the left Standing outside the entrance to the Wheatsheaf are: T Heritage, A Hazell, Mrs Hillman
and A Hillman about 1926 The old thatched cottages in Rope Way
that were demolished in the 1960s Wallington’s were in Rope Way in the 1940s and 50s… and delivered firewood on their lorries Left to right we see Neville Pearce, Gordon Pierce,
Terry Adkins and John Hawtin At the entrance to Ashburton Lane we see
Buck Woodward and his wife The three-storey dwelling facing us by the entrance
to the Park… was the home of George Somerton,
a carrier in the last century In 1875 there were three carriers in Hook Norton… going to Banbury and Chipping Norton
several times a week Carriers in 1907 were John Osborne, Walter Wyton
and J Thomas Bench Charles Wyton was a carrier with a Ford van
in the 1920s A sow with a litter of pigs at the back of
Ashburton House early this century This Black and Sandy pig originated in the
Hook Norton area… during the middle of the last century… and became very popular due to their very tasty bacon Southrop House which has a date-stone of 1707… also has an outside staircase… one of several which are special features
in Hook Norton The large garden at the rear of the house has been
the scene of many village events in the past Hook Norton football team, Cup winners,
outside the Sun in 1930 with the Reverend Beardshaw The four in the front row are H Woodward, T Williams, Harry Heritage and Ralph Padbury A large gathering of supporters for the Cup winners in the 1922-23 season The football team around 1930 The 1947-48 season was an outstanding one… Hook Norton team winning three cups: the Chipping Norton Charity Cup,
the Rollright Engineers’ Cup… and the Chipping Norton League Cup In the back row are Mr Painter,
Mr Coppage, J Tooley, G White… N Stratford, J Padbury, W Gardener,
W Horn and Bill Clark In the centre: T Adkins, T Harris and G Manly On the front row: Frank Horn, Ken Smith, T Wright,
A Page and Percy Stratford Cricketers about 1953 Back row: Charlie Hewitt, Hawtin Heritage, Gordon White, Aubrey Heritage, Jack Gray and P Hearn Centre: John Goddard, Charley Hollis, Bill Clark,
Harry Heritage and Colonel Colchester Front row: Geoff Hillman, Arthur Page and Ken Smith From Mobbs Lane we look into Chapel Street The shop on the right at this time was kept by J Tims, furniture, fruiterer and seedsman He was followed by his son Archibald Mr Gillet had a chemist’s shop here and J Dumbleton sold fruit, vegetables, etc Laurie Heath took over as a shop
and a post office in 1978 On the opposite side of the road in 1895
William Somerton was keeping the Blackbird Inn… which was a Hopcraft & Norris house
that closed around 1915 The landlord then had a butcher’s shop
at Gosling’s Cottage The Wesleyan chapel was built in 1885
on the site of several cottages The stone being used from the demolished chapel
down Tite Lane The earliest mention of a Wesleyan congregation
in Hook Norton was 1794 The broken windows were some of many damaged
in the village by a severe hailstorm… on September the 22nd 1935 The chapel was demolished in 1985
after being in existence for only a hundred years Below the chapel and monkey puzzle tree
is the Post Office… moved from High Street to here in 1924 It was taken over by Mrs Cox,
followed by her daughter, Mrs Heath It had the first telephone exchange The letterbox can just be seen in the bottom corner
of the window The house has a date-stone of 1676
and the letters P T M This is a Chipping Norton Bowyer Lodge of Freemasons… arriving to lay the foundation stone of the Memorial Hall on May 20th 1921 The site was bought from Edward Minchin
for £121 16s It had previously been the village pound which was moved to the Horse Fair corner of Bourne Lane Pounds were no longer in use after 1856 The opening ceremony was performed
on October 14th 1922… by the Earl of Plymouth, arriving here in his Daimler limousine Here we see the opening ceremony The Committee, with the Earl of Plymouth in the centre The parish council meetings now moved
from the old school to here There was also a library in the hall
with Miss Dickins as first librarian The interior of the hall… which was built by Alfred Williams at a total cost
of £2,500 A series of free concerts celebrated the opening One month later, November 1922,
the Women’s Institute was formed This is the hall, probably in the 1930s,
with the hut that was used by John Harris… and the Brymbo one just below In 1928 there was still an outstanding debt
of £275 on the hall… which was not finally paid off until October 1932… and in 1930 there were problems with the south wall May Day with Winnie Pinfold as Queen
with her attendants Silver Jubilee celebrations in 1935 Julia Horn, Roger Ainley and Margaret Painter On June 16th 1887, Queen Victoria’s Silver Jubilee
was celebrated Church bells rang at 6 a.m. A procession of children to the church for
the 11 a.m. service… and a meat tea in the Park,
with sports all day and a bonfire at night May Day in 1938 in Wisteria House garden… when Margaret Painter was the Queen Maypole children and their decorated horse-drawn Oxfordshire wagon behind… but the location is unknown An early picture of May Day celebrations in Hook Norton, with the fruit trees in bloom Dancing around the maypole in the Square in 1938 An early 1890s view of the Triangle… and the Old Surgery in the centre with no house adjoining The thatch on the dwelling on the left was replaced
by tiles in the 1930s Elijah Gardner, a thatcher, lived in the house on the right at one time In the 1930s members of the Parish Council… consistently complained about the dangerous crossroads here Looking towards the Triangle from the Sibford Road Probably a wedding group in about 1900… outside the house on the Triangle… which was recently extended by Mr and Mrs Smith The Old Surgery on the right, where Dr Routh
in the last century… and Dr Mottram in this each held a surgery They were both from Sibford, from where Hook Norton relied mainly for its doctors Notice the old oil lamp on the Triangle This shows the porch and front door to Long Thatch from the footpath with the iron railings In the wall lower down is a post box… that was cleared at 11:40 a.m., 4:35 p.m.
and 7 p.m. It was probably removed when the Post Office moved from High Street to Chapel Street Early days on the Green In 1895 H Coles, a farmer, corn dealer and baker,
lived at the end… and his board can be seen over the doorway Other tradesmen on the Green have included a stonemason, carriage builder… seedsman, newsagent, fruiterer and stationmaster About 1903 Baker Coles’s cottage and probably
two others were completely burnt down This shows the Coles family and others after the fire In 1903 Allen and Henry George were builders living
on the Green Here they are in the ruins after a fire
which we have been told was in their workshop Hook Norton won the Best Kept Village Competition
in 1962 Villagers outside the old school witnessed the presentation of the award The wedding of Mr J Fairbrother and Miss Andrews… about 1923 outside the Railway Hotel The Andrews were landlords here at this time Club Day in the Square in 1910 Club Days were held on the Tuesday before Whitsun… the Club being a local benefit society A large smartly dressed crowd watch the Riding Circus or Jenny horses In 1869 the Hook Norton Benefit Society were meeting at the Sun Inn One of the many stalls that would have lined High Street Club Day in 1911 and numerous flowery hats A visiting band playing for the occasion It could have been the Britannia Works Band
from Banbury The Hook Norton Band played in 1912 This gives a good view of the metal arch over the entrance to the churchyard Club Day and Hook Norton Band with the Bodicote banner behind and some of their members Different village clubs often celebrated with each other Club Day in 1912 with members and the band
on the Rectory lawn In this century there was also
the Pig Insurance Association… the Benevolent and Sick Society and the Funeral Fund Another gathering on the Rectory lawn with the Club banner in the centre… and members holding their wooden staffs Hook Norton Agricultural Association was very active in the early part of this century Here the root crop samples are laid out ready for judging in the Square… while the sacks of corn were in the archway of Belldin The ploughing match was held in various fields around the village The Shearing Close was the site for judging
heavy horses, sheep and pigs The Farm Stock and Root Grain Show has also been held behind the Hermitage… now Heyden House in East End Flick & Locke held farm stock sales
in the Shearing Close early this century A play, “The Confidential Maid”, at a Conservative
garden party at the Manor The cast are Harry Baker, Miss Clarke, Nancy Hambridge and one unknown The pastoral play “Sir Barnaby Blaydon” at the
Flower Show in 1921 The Rag Row The white gate was an entrance to farmland
and buildings, also the Butts Just above is High Rock This road has been known as the Horse Fair and Heydon’s Lane The six Rag Row thatched cottages were being lived in till the late 1950s This is a photo of them in the 1960s… shortly to be rebuilt and turned into one dwelling
known as Yew Tree cottage The entrance to the Glebe is on the right These houses were built on church allotments and completed in 1947 Some of the cottages from the lane side Milk churns were brought to the end of the lane
for collection… and can just be seen in the bottom left hand corner High Rock was built about the beginning of this century by the George brothers Fairview above, once the home of Tom Williams A lady with a handbag and a milk can
and some well-dressed children Just below Fairview is a wooden hut… which was used by Dr Taylor then Dr Agnew, both of Sibford, as a surgery In later years, it was replaced by a Portakabin
till around 1970 On the site of the new school we see Harry Hine,
Mr Baker’s carter, with a single furrow plough Above the dwellings opposite is where Hicks’s Lodge was built in 1934 on a site that cost only £25 Mr Hicks employed around 60 men building houses for the Chipping Norton… Brackley and Shipston-on-Stour
Rural District Councils… and numerous houses in the villages around, including the Glebe in Hook Norton Unfortunately he died in 1957
at the age of 54 Hook Norton band was formed in 1888 Prior to this, bands from Banbury, Bloxham
and other villages were playing in the village In 1880 Mr D Kay’s band was leading the processions The Hook Norton Wesleyan Mission Band
was formed in 1885… and was in existence into the earlier part of this century The band at the time of John Harris, who is standing by the drummer He was their conductor at one time… also Chief Fire Officer for 33 years… and Clerk to the Parish Council for 50 years He died in 1955 The band that played for Coronation Day celebrations
on May 12th 1937 Horace Busby is the band master here Leading the parade at the Flower Show in 1922… and in the same year playing at Swerford Club The band under the tree in the Shearing Close for the 1929 Flower Show The staging supported by beer barrels Hook Norton Band lead the Armistice Day procession
in Bloxham in the 1950s An Armistice parade from church in Hook Norton
about 1960… with ex-servicemen, Fire Brigade and Girl Guides St Peter’s Day Tea in 1925 with the Reverend Beardshaw This annual event on June 29th started in 1891
and ended in 1946 St Peter’s Day in 1921 Teas were usually served in the Rectory garden… but a picnic in the park has been known
to take place instead A group of all ages in 1925 At the 1923 event, with the Reverend Freeman
in his customary straw boater After a fire at Hook Norton on August 4th 1911 Decorated for the jubilee of 1935… with the trailer pump that was brought in 1930 for £435 Until the Second World War the Brigade was under the authority of the Parish Council Afterwards the County Council took charge In the Shearing Close with the trailer pump are: Standing: C Cox, F Wyton, J Radborne, W Clarke… H Borsberry, E Marshall, G Horn and E Haynes Seated are: E Phipps, F Hopkins and E Turnock The horse-drawn Merryweather fire pump in the Shearing Close for the Flower Show At this time horses had to be found from
the coal merchant, the carriers or the bakers… before the Fire Brigade could move off The new fire station was opened in 1953 A rick fire on August 5th 1911 Hay ricks often overheated in those days
and could set themselves alight The Hook Norton Choral Society on the steps of the Town Hall at Chipping Norton in 1912… with their conductor Miss Margaret Dickins… after a competition against choirs
from over a large area The Women’s Institute Choir at the St Pancras Hall Choral Society competition… with Mr Cunningham, their choir master, in 1950 In the late 1930s, younger men of Hook Norton… formed a branch of the St John’s Ambulance Brigade… which was affiliated to the Banbury Division… and are seen here on parade This is probably the opening ceremony of their hut
at the top of Queen Street The Reverend Nind making a speech with
Mrs Crossman, their President, and Mr Coppage… who, apart from being the stationmaster… was also churchwarden from 1926 till he died in 1960 Members pose for a photo outside the hut And the interior of the hut which was used for talks
and demonstrations When St John’s came to an end it was taken over
for band practice It was the custom for the procession at most celebrations to start at Hollybush corner This is a small part of one about to pass Heydon House for the Silver Jubilee of 1935 In 1929 the Parish Council was asking for white lines on the village corners On the right we see Heydon House, probably occupied by James Harris at this time… before he moved near to his timber business
in Down End After he left, his son John lived here In addition to the 2-acre plot behind the dwelling was
a small paddock The heavy horses for the timber wagons
were housed here… and their stables with large wooden partitions still remain here A building here was used for a short time as a
Primitive Methodist chapel… and the building nearest this way is thatched here Part of Arley House on the right with a thatched roof Between this house and Salfords is a stone wall
with a garden behind In 1875 William Luckett lived in a house here He was a carrier, carpenter and coal merchant East End Farm House with its railings in front The lane adjoining led to the Workhouse
where there were 24 inmates in 1814 It closed in 1836, when the Banbury Workhouse
was opened… and it was converted to nine cottages The house on the right was occupied by Alfred Williams He was a builder, coal merchant and undertaker
employing around 40 men and boys Behind this dwelling was a large plot of land
which he used as a timber yard The neatly thatched cottage adjoining belonged to the Brymbo Ironstone Company early this century The front door has now been moved
to an extension to the left Note the de-restriction sign on the triangle, surely
an odd place to put it – just before a sharp bend An old view from Hollybush corner showing the milk delivery from the churn on wheels… and East End farm house before the castellation, porch and bay windows were added On the right the entrance from the pavement to one of the six thatched cottages… which were demolished in the early 1950s The site is now occupied by two bungalows… one with a date-stone of 1956 and W T H During the Silver Jubilee celebrations
Miss Dickins plants a tree along the Station Road An 1890s view of Hook Norton station The wagons on the left would have been brought from Austin’s Way loaded with ironstone The station opened on April 6th 1887
with no special ceremony… and there were four trains each way
from Banbury to Kingham An early view of the entrance to the station On the right, a branch line with loaded wagons… and behind them the waiting-room and the first signal box on the up line The passenger service closed on June 4th 1951… and the goods on November 4th 1968 A closer view of the first signal box John Harris, an insurance agent, had it erected next to the Memorial Hall for use as his office… when a new one was built on the other side of the line In the 1890s the journey from here to Birmingham
took 2 hours 14 minutes A later view showing the new signal box on
the Banbury side of the main building The metal bridge over the Banbury Road
can just be seen on the left Squire Faulkner had the Railway Hotel built
at the turn of the century… and shortly afterwards it was sold to the
Hook Norton Brewery Company A later view showing the goods shed and the coal trucks on the left… and, on the right, a large heap of stone that was needed to reinforce the track The Swansea and Cardiff to Newcastle express It only stopped very rarely, at special request and with several days’ notice The time was 12:18 p.m. and the one in the opposite direction at 4 minutes past 4 The first express ran in 1907, on six days a week But this service was not restored after
the Second World War The Earl of Dudley Ironstone Works was situated on
the east side of the main viaduct… and only in operation from 1901 to 1916 The single kiln was filled at the ratio of 5 cwt of coal
to a ton of ironstone, then fired This shows the branch line that supplied the coal for
the kiln and brought out the fired ironstone… to be delivered to the Round Oak Works at Selly Oak A cable system moved the stone and coal between
the branch line and the kiln… with Southrop and the village in the background From the east side: the Dudley kiln and the main viaduct Underneath the girder-work was a catwalk… from where the permanent way ganger
made a daily inspection of the track Trap doors either side of a pillar allowed him to proceed along the viaduct The width of the top of the pillar was 10 feet… and the girder-work rested on rollers with a gap
to allow for expansion The viaducts were tested periodically,
on a Sunday morning Two engines came out from Banbury
and were coupled together near the tunnel Scaffolding was erected, as seen here,
so that any movement in the ironwork could be detected At a given signal the two engines, together weighing around 200 tons… proceeded over the viaduct at 40 miles an hour A view along the top of the viaduct showing a guardrail to prevent derailment The express on the viaduct in 1908
making its way towards Chipping Norton and Kingham This shows more clearly the catwalk,
and the Dudley works The building of the massive pillars, with the help of
a steam-powered derrick to raise the stones At this time many villagers were making money… boarding the workers and hiring out horses Demolition of the girder-work in 1965 In 1966 it was considered by some that
the remaining pillars were an eyesore A letter from British Rail stated that the pillars were in such good condition… that to demolish them and clear away the stone was an expense they could not afford Luckily they are still being preserved So much effort that served a purpose
for so short a time This site and further land was bought by the
Hook Norton Ironstone Company… and the first of these two kilns was working
between 1896 and 1900 A steam-operated lift took the stone to the top of the kilns The First World War brought extra demand
and two more kilns were added, one on either side They were about 65 feet high and connected
by a 2-foot gauge track A rotary tipper at each kiln conveyed the stone
from the trams to the kilns Very briefly, the purpose of the kiln was to dry out
the moisture… clean the stone and create around 28% loss in weight Loaded trams about to leave for the kilns Explosives were used to loosen the stone
which was usually around 14 feet deep In 1915 men got four pence ha’penny for filling a tram with about 25 cwt of stone Trams being loaded in the Park Farm land The topsoil was wheeled by hand across the plank
to the worked-out area A closer view of this operation By 1926, calcining was coming to an end… the stone being transferred directly into railway wagons The steam navvy bought in 1915
and seen here at Park Farm The grader and riddler is behind It was mounted on rails and moved along by horse A Wilson Showman’s engine was bought to go with it
to provide the electric light This allowed the equipment to work in the dark
during the First World War period Men standing in front of the riddler which helped
to remove soil from the stone… which it conveyed to empty trams
situated on a line alongside This equipment was needed to supply the big demand
at this time The engine Joan with trams near the lift The boiler on the left supplied power for the lift Behind the engine is the gas supply
with rails round the top Electricity was made here to light the area
and allow a 24-hour day to be worked By 1946 all ironstone workings had completely finished Mrs Mobley with a converted shooting-brake that came from Scotland With her husband George she was a carrier to Banbury
in the 1930s This photo was taken in the centre of Bloxham Osney mill at the end of the last century It is situated on the parish boundary with Swerford… and described as “the mill of Hook Norton that is by Swerford” The Lord of the Manor of Swerford claimed his right to the mill which caused much dispute A lady stands on the footbridge
over the ford of the River Swere The extensive buildings behind eventually became
little used and by the 1930s were being demolished… and the stone used to build a dwelling just above Charlie Hall standing by the engine
with his thrashing tackle… which was moved around local farms by teams of horses to thrash the corn from the ricks The charge for a day’s thrashing in the 1920s was £5
for the equipment and two men Seven or eight more men would have been needed Oscar Hall of Bacon Farm entertains
the thrashing gang at dinner time He had a wooden leg but was capable of walking behind a single furrow plough and two horses all day Stosh White, a Hook Norton pig killer… shows Oscar how to dress pigs at Bacon Farm Oscar’s wife and daughter stand by
their horse-drawn trap… ready to take their Harvest Festival decorations
to Hook Norton church Situated between the Gate Hangs High and the Wigginton crossroads was the Old Lodge farm house… built to an L-plan with a date-stone of 1646 It was occupied till around 1950 but considered unsafe in the late 60s and demolished It had also been known as the Fox and Hounds
public house In 1890 a licence was granted
after two years without one At one time it was used by drovers on their way
to Banbury market There was a pound nearby in which to leave
their animals Nil Farm House, dated 1777,
was also known as Rectory Farm This dovecote in the farmyard suggests that it was
a manor or religious house at one time The room below was known as the men’s room In the farm buildings are the remains of
two thrashing floors In 1871 Nil Farm was 562 acres and employed
16 men and 5 boys This is Frederick Pinfold, landlord of
the Gate Hangs High in the 1920s He spent much of his time rabbiting,
which explains the ferrets on his shoulders His small number of farm animals could be seen grazing the local roadside verges in the summer This is his wife at the entrance with Olive and Ivy Hook Norton Brewery took over the inn around 1900 This was another resting place for drovers There were gates across the road to retain their animals, which were not necessary later Hence “this gate hangs high and hinders none” In front of the Gate are Mrs Pinfold and family
in a pony trap… with an old car to the left In 1518 William Scotte owned land in this area… and it is said that the Gate area was known as Scott’s Lodge Off the Banbury Road is Manor Farm,
previously known as Lampitt’s Farm It was church property till the 19th century On the house is a date-stone of 1791 Of the 41 farms listed in 1873,
only four were over 100 acres At Park Farm in the 1930s we see William Page
on the binder… and his son Arthur on the leading horse This car was said to have run into a heap of road-mending stone by the Brymbo cottages The driver survived To end our film we would like to say thank you to all
who have helped with their memories Having been round most of the village of the past,
we return to Hollybush corner… from where many processions into the village started… and wonder what a similar procession in the future would reveal

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